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Artist: Utagawa Kuniyasu (歌川国安)

Print: Iwai Hanshirō V (岩井半四郎) on the right as Gokuin no Osen (極印のお千) and Segawa Kikunojō V (瀬川菊之丞) on the left as Hotei no Oichi (布袋のお市) - two panels of a triptych

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Dates: 1820,created
Dimensions: 20.0 in,14.75 in,Overall dimensions
Medium: Japanese color woodblock print
Inscription:

Signed: Kuniyasu ga (国安画)
Publisher: Ōmiya Heihachi (Marks 413 - seal 01-108)
Censor's seal: kiwame

Related links: Waseda University - left panel; Waseda University - right panel; Waseda University - missing panel of the triptych; Hankyu Culture Foundation - left hand panel; Hankyu Culture Foundation - right hand panel; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston - a Sadatora tetraptych with female otokodate, but without the swords; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston - a Toyokuni III triptych from the mid-1840s showing female otokodate with swords; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston - a 1792 Shun'ei pentaptych of female otokodate;

Physical description:

These two onnagata represent to the two outer panels of a triptych. The center panel shows a male figure, Karigane Bunshichi, played by Onoe Kikugorō III.

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Notice the swords both women are wearing. Therefore they are female otokodate.

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There was a play produced in 1863 in which "...female thief Hanaoka, who holds 5 different names and disguises (Kaminari no Onaru, Gokuin Osen, Hotei no Oichi, Annozaka no Odaka and Karigane no Obun)..." Is this the same case here? Very possibly and is worth a lot more research.

The source here is Kabuki 21, but the choice of bold type is ours.

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Above are links to several compositions different artists at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston showing these female otokodate and others.

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The otokodate frequently carried shakuhachi> flutes both for playing and to as symbols of their authority because they often used them as weapons. This is true of female otokodate too. (JSV)