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Artist: Utagawa Kuniyoshi (歌川国芳)

Print: The Cloth-fulling Jewel River in Settsu Province
(Settsu no kuni Tōi no Tamagawa - 摂津国檮衣の玉川) from an
untitled triptych series of the 'Six Jewel Rivers' (Mu Tamagawa - 六玉川)  

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Dates: circa 1847 - 1852,created
Dimensions: 10.0 in,14.75 in,Overall dimensions
Medium: Japanese color woodblock print
Inscription:

Signed: Ichiyūsai Kuniyoshi ga
一勇斎国芳画 on each sheet
Artist's seal: kiri
Publisher: Sanoya Kihei
(Marks 446 seal 25-210)
Censor seals: Hama and Kinugasa

Related links: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; University of Osaka ; Tokyo Metropolitan Library - right panel; Tokyo Metropolitan Library - middle panel; Tokyo Metropolitan Library - left panel; Rijksmuseum - left panel; Rijksmuseum - middle panel; Rijksmuseum - right panel; National Diet Library; Museum für angewandte Kunst, Vienna - right panel; Museum für angewandte Kunst, Vienna - middle panel; Museum für angewandte Kunst, Vienna - left panel;

Physical description:

On the bank of the Tōi Crystal River, a woman kneeling by a fulling-block beating cloth. A child behind her. A woman on the left is taking away rolls of cloth that have already been treated. Village houses in the distance.

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The Tōi Jewel River is the furthest south of the six, name-related, rivers. They "...were famous in Japan for their pure, clear waters. Although geographically far apart, they shared a common name, and their peculiarities and poetic pseudonyms were often used as the titles in series of six prints." Quoted from: Playthings and Pastimes in Japanese Prints by Lea Baten, p. 144.

Minamoto Shunrai (1055?-1129?) wrote:

Whispering wind in ancient pines
desolate autumn
in the village by the Jewel river
where clothes are wrung.

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"The catalogue of the Baur Collection, Geneva, illustrates all six triptychs in what is in effect a series, though it does not have a title... Each displays the name of the province and that of the Jewel river within a snowflake-shaped cartouche."

Quoted from: Kuniyoshi from the Arthur R. Miller Collection by Timothy Clark, p. 162.